A Beautiful and Unique Harbourside Heritage Municipality – AT RISK.

Hunters Hill is Australia’s oldest garden suburban area and one of the nation’s most significant heritage places and municipalities. Positioned on a peninsular between the Lanecove and Parramatta rivers, it was settled early in the colonial era, and rapidly developed it’s own unique character, consisting of large locally quarried sandstone villas, churches and manors, and small sandstone and timber workers cottages, set in a green bushland setting with rivers either side.   Proclaimed a municipality  1861, it has remained an independent and vibrant municipality ever since, focused on heritage and conservation. Hunters Hill Municipality recently celebrated its Sesquicentenary. It contains more heritage buildings and places per head of population than any other local government area in the nation.

original jacaranda henley photo 2 photo 1 photo 1

CONSTANTLY UNDER THREAT – BUT PROTECTED BY A VIGILANT COMMUNITY

Hunters Hill is constantly under threat from the pressures of overdevelopment and / or the impacts of unwelcome take-over bids / forced amalgamation with neighbouring councils. This has bred  a vigilant and passionate local community with a deep sense of belonging and a tradition of, and commitment to conservation and preservation.

Well known battles have been fought (and won) over the preservation of Kellys Bush in the 1970s (See Battle for Kellys Bush under Past Threats), and to prevent a forced amalgamation with Ryde Council in 2003.

The Save Hunters Hill Municipality Co-alition, was formed in 2003 and played a key role in averting the threat of amalgamation with Ryde Council.This saw the first highly successful “Ribbon campaign” in which local residents tied Ribbons of the Municipal colours (Red, Blue, Green, Yellow and White)  on their homes, and around trees through-out the municipality as a protest against the proposed amalgamation.
All past attempts to amalgamate Hunters Hill with surrounding councils have failed. Those attempting to do so came over time to realise the significance of the area to the nation, the strength of its community, and the many adverse impacts that would flow if it was amalgamated.